Currently viewing the tag: "metal"

Triumph – Never Surrender (MCA) 1982

1. “Too Much Thinkin” (5:34)
2. “A World of Fantasy” (5:03)
3. “A Minor Prelude” (:43)
4. “All the Way” (4:22)
5. “Battle Cry” (4:57)
6. “Overture (Procession)” (1:54)
7. “Never Surrender” (6:40)
8. “When the Lights Go Down” (5:03)
9. “Writing on the Wall” (3:34)
10. “Epilogue (Resolution)” (2:41)

Triumph CDs never seem to show up in the used bins, so when I spoted this one I snagged it I was already familiar with the title track, “Never Surrender”, and I knew I liked this song. However, once I got the disc home and popped it into the CD player, I just couldn’t get into this one like I did some of their earlier albums. There are a few standouts cuts, as in the aformentioned title track and “A World of Fantasy” as well. Overall, however, I much prefer “Allied Forces” and “Progressions of Power” over this disc.

Triumph – Progressions of Power (TML Entertainment) 1980

1. I Live for the Weekend (5:18)
2. I Can Survive (4:00)
3. In the Night (6:16)
4. Nature’s Child (5:41)
5. Woman in Love (4:37)
6. Take My Heart (3:28)
7. Tear the Roof Off (4:28)
8. Fingertalkin [instrumental] (1:58)
9. Hard Road (5:22)

Progressions was somewhat of a crossroads album for this power-trio band from Canada. The band’s third release retains a certain amount of that raw and gritty sound of “Rock & Roll Machine”, but also contains some smooth, melodic arena rock which would become the band’s calling card on future releases. Drummer Gil Moore handles lead vocals on five of the eight tracks with vocals. Emmett’s high, smooth vocals are added to “In the Night”, “Take My Heart” and album closer “Hard Road”, which is also one of the albums best tracks. Actually, the album opens and closes on a high note. “I Live for the Weekend” is a fantastic anthem. “Take My Heart” is probably the weakest moment on the album, being the obligatory ballad that just isn’t one of the band’s best. “Fingertalkin” is a classical guitar instrumental, that showcases Emmett’s charismatic guitar style.

“Progressions of Power” was initially released on RCA Records and peaked at #32 on the Billboard album charts in 1980. The album was later re-released in 1985 on MCA, in 1995 on TRC and then finally remastered in 2005 and released on the band’s own TML Entertainment label.

Triumph – Just a Game (MCA) 1979

1. “Movin’ On” (4:07)
2. “Lay It on the Line” (4:02)
3. “Young Enough to Cry” (6:03)
4. “American Girls” (5:01)
5. “Just a Game” (6:13)
6. “Fantasy Serenade” [instrumental] (1:39)
7. “Hold On” (6:04)
8. “Suitcase Blues” (3:01)

With  ”Just a Game” Triumph took a definite step up in quality from anything they had done before. They showcased quite a bit of diversity here, from the classy hard rock hit “Lay It on the Line” to the blues of “Young Enough to Cry” to the classically inspired instrumental ” Fantasy Serenade”. “Hold On” is a superb ballad that is does not sound like it was forced for radio play. My favorite track, however, is the title track. It’s a hard rocker with a lot of emotion and melody. Of course, “Lay It on the Line” was the big hit from this record and is one of the handful of Triumph songs that tend to still be played on rock radio thirty years later.

Triumph – Rock ‘n’ Roll Machine (MCA) 1977

1. “Takes Time” (3:48)
2. “Bringing It on Home” (4:38)
3. “Rocky Mountain Way ” (4:08)
4. “Street Fighter” (3:29)
5. “Street Fighter (Reprise)” (3:06)
6. “24 Hours A Day” (4:28)
7. “Blinging Ligh Show/Moonchild” (8:40)
8. “Rock and Roll Machine” (6:53)

Triumph’s major label debut. Actually their first two albums are a bit confusing as they were combined into this one album when they were signed by MCA, at least that is the story as I know it. (Correct me if I am wrong, please.) In anycase, “Rock ‘n’ Roll Machine” is a classic 70′s heavy metal platter. By today’s standards I suppose this is nothing more than an old rock album. However in it’s time it was quite heavy. I don’t pretend to admit that “Rock and Roll Machine” was groundbreaking or even outstanding, however, it is a good listen from beginning to end. “Rocky Mountain Way” is a decent Joe Walsh cover, although not much different than the original version. I much prefer Triumph’s original material

Sport of Kings 3/5 Stars (banophernalia.com)

The Songs: Tears In The Rain / Somebody’s Out There / What Rules My Heart / If Only / Hooked On You / Take A Stand / Just One Night / Embrujo (Instrumental) / Play With The Fire / Don’t Love Anybody Else But Me / In The Middle Of The Night

1986 – man even the year brings back a warm sense of nostalgia. The radio still played rock and roll, and hair metal was killing rock for everybody who liked big guitars and bombastic drums. Triumph was still Canada’s other power trio. Gil, Rik, and Mike were still functioning in relative harmony and Sport of Kings was another solid record. I’ll admit to a bias toward Rik’s songs and voice in the band. As the guitar player he was front and centre, and viewed by default as the front man. This probably wasn’t a good position for Gil who as the other singer, songwriter and as the drummer he was at the back on the riser. Although part of the fun on a Triumph album was the interplay between Rik and Gil – on this one each had a pretty solid hit. “Somebody Out” There for Rik, and “Just One Night” for Gil.

Musically this one is typical of the time. Triumph was always a hit and miss band for me. I’d like some of the songs, but rarely did an entire album strike home for me. This one was close – there’s really no filler, just solid rock songs – but nothing that truly pushes it to the next level.